Amy Silverman’s “My Heart Can’t Even Believe It” is a very special book.

When I read My Heart Can’t Even Believe It, A Story of Science, Love and Down Syndrome by Amy Silverman, it was the first hard copy book I had read in at least two years. My commitment to reading books on Kindle cost me several months of insight and understanding I would have gained from this special book.

Amy Silverman has written the book every family member, teacher or school administrator who knows a child with Down syndrome must read. I gave a copy to my daughter, a middle school special education teacher more as a work assignment than as a present. The book, is flat out, the best documentary I have ever read on how Down syndrome affects a family.

Yet, the powerful, captivating book is so much more than that. It is a carefully researched book, but that research is always done in the context of a search for a better life for the author’s daughter born with Down syndrome, Sophie, and other family members.

I have never seen the interactions with a school system, the search for  a link with Alzheimer’s Disease and Down syndrome, or the ethics of searching for a “magic pill” to fix Down syndrome explored with this kind of intensity and effectiveness.  This book is both intellectual and passionately heartfelt by a loving mother. That is one difficult trick.

Amy Silverman has grit. I know her quite well and she takes no prisoners. The book carries an “attitude” and the F-word can be jarring, although effective. It also reveals a mom who hurts, cries and hopes impossible dreams. One would do this book a disservice by calling it a memoir. It is too well-researched and educational for that moniker. It is more a passionate first-person study of the intersection between heartbreaking experience and tough-as-nails journalism. And the damn thing can be funny. For example, Amy’s dogged pursuit of why people with Down syndrome don’t have curly hair pops up throughout the book and had me laughing amid my tears.

Let me address the elephant in the metaphorical room. In December of 2014  I juxtaposed my own physical disability with my son Jason’s experiences with Down syndrome in what was clearly a memoir called Some People Even Take Them Home. The two books are as different as a whale and a lion. Oh sure, they are both about parents coping with children with Down syndrome. Both parents fall on the smart-ass side of the scale and both parents are straight ahead people when it comes to coping with challenges. But that’s about it for similarities.

The biggest difference in the two books  is about 22 IQ points–the difference between Sophie’s higher IQ and Jason’s. That means a whole different set of challenges socially, educationally and in expectations. Sophie can read. Jason can’t. Sophie can be mainstreamed and Jason never achieved that.  Those key differences make Sophie’s life far richer, but much more complicated, even messy. Amy had to navigate school issues, drama class exclusion and segregated cheerleading in ways I never did. It is in her tales of exactly those kind of day-to-day problems that the richness of Amy’s book emerges.

The other clear difference in the book is that while I chose the 50,ooo foot memory approach, Amy chose to buttress many of her experiences with solid research. Her research is outstanding. Throughout the book I found my self saying, “Really?  I didn’t know that.” The most profound discovery Amy led me to is an incredibly disturbing one. She explores the links between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s in ways I have not previously understood. If her numbers are correct we have much to worry about the future of our Down syndrome children. Jason is probably not going to be happy with the way I scrutinize his memory and other actions from this day forward.

I am sorry I delayed reading Amy’s tremendous book, but now the least I can do is heartily, unconditionally recommend it to others.  This is one damn important book.

 

Tim J. McGuire is the author of “Some People Even Take Them Home.”

 

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