Love is a verb and it would be nice if we all understood that

My new wife, Candace Hadley McGuire, is smart and deeply compassionate. She amazes me with her concern for other people. But she also articulates her concern beautifully.

If I had a nickel for every time she tells me “love is a verb,” I would have a damn big jar full of nickels. Her powerful point is that love without action, love without good deeds or love without solving a problem is hollow.

It is easy to say I am in love with you, but it is far more difficult to say I love you and my behavior will prove it.

Pope Francis’ visit to the United States last week prompted me to think of Candace’s words. The Pope doesn’t spout theoretical puffery about love, he goes to lunch with the homeless. He hugs immigrants and pays special attention to children. He makes love a verb and many Americans are stumped by his behavior. One Fox News commentator said he’s “tired” of the Pope and suggested he is in the wrong country.

Perhaps the Pope doesn’t have American values and, sadly, that may be a good thing. This media obsession with whether the Pope is liberal or conservative is absolutely silly. He is a man of faith who believes that rules and prescriptions don’t create love, actions do.

Rather than attempting to categorize the Pope as liberal or conservative, Americans should be listening and watching Francis love. The truth is that in our me-obsessed, Ayn Rand believing, selfish society, it does seem radical to actively love everyone. Americans keep insisting we are a Christian nation, but too often we hate people who are different than us and we care little for those who have less than we do. The rhetoric from some Presidential candidates is terrifically anti-Christian. That Sermon on the Mount thing from Jesus should guide us to love and care.

If we truly let Pope Francis show us that love is a verb, this country would look different. It might actually look like a country concerned about something bigger than self-interest.

Tim J McGuire is the author of “Some People Even Take Them Home” A Disabled Dad, A Down Syndrome Son and Our Journey To Acceptance

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