Jason, the remarkable gift that keeps on giving

A million thoughts flooded my brain Saturday as I married the lovely and charming Candace Medd Hadley. I will probably discuss many of them in future posts, but my son with Down syndrome, Jason McGuire, took a big share of those thoughts.

Jason was his ebullient self throughout the day, though he was particularly worried about the one task I assigned him. Jason was in charge of handing the wedding rings to the priest. His incredibly loving siblings, Tracy and Jeff, were as concerned as Jason was about his job so they took him to the church basement and practiced. Jason executed the exchange several times to his brother and sister so he was ready when the time came.

Here are the words of his job coach at his workplace: “Jason  was very chatty about it all and said his favorite part was holding the rings! He showed me step by step what his job was and said he didn’t drop the rings or get them stuck on his finger. He said it was good they didn’t get stuck otherwise he would have had to marry his step mom! He had such a great time and he is so happy.”

Oh, what a mess that would have been if he would have had to marry his step-mom. There is a country song in that to be sure. That logic is typical of Jason. He believes that you wear seat belts to prevent an accident. I remember his mom, my late wife Jean and I were once walking through the underground metro in Paris. We were very confused because we only understood a very little bit of French. In our befuddlement, Jean observed, “this is how Jason goes through life, with a little bit of a clue, but never completely understanding.”

That phenomenon was in full effect at the wedding reception Saturday. As a close friend of mine put it, “he held court like no other.”  Yet, when his brother wanted Jason to join him for a toast he hated to be pulled away from his wedding cake. There must be priorities and a toast versus more cake didn’t seem close to Jason.

As I watched, and now reflect on Jason’s delightful antics and the way he endears himself to everyone he meets, I also reflect on a piece of state legislation in Ohio. Abortion opponents are pushing Ohio to make it illegal for a doctor to perform an abortion if a woman is terminating her pregnancy to avoid having a baby with Down syndrome. I find the proposed legislation an incredible invasion of privacy and an infringement of civil liberties and generally repugnant. Yet, as I write in my book “Some People Even Take Them Home,” “I can say unequivocally that I believe our world would be an inferior place if there were no Down syndrome children. The pursuit of the perfect baby would deprive our world of real joys and triumphs. I hope the optimism that is inherent in this book may provide intellectual and emotional fuel for making those life-changing decisions.”

I don’t wish Down syndrome on a child or parent but last Saturday my overpowering thought was how awful it would be if there wasn’t a Jason at that wedding to touch people’s hearts. His sweet cluelessness and deep kindness makes us all special people.

Tim J McGuire is the author of “Some People Even Take Them Home” A Disabled Dad, A Down Syndrome Son and Our Journey To Acceptance

3 thoughts on “Jason, the remarkable gift that keeps on giving

  1. It was wonderful to meet “up close and personal” your mother and children whom I grew to know so well through your book and blogs. I took Jason’s hand just before the ceremony and his smile lit up the room….It was so heartwarming to look from his happy face to yours that day. A gift.

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